The Bar

3 Pump Court

3 Pump Court

5 New Square

5 New Square

6 Pump Court

6 Pump Court

Aldous LJ

Aldous LJ

Aldous, Guy

Aldous, Guy

Aldous, William

Aldous, William

Alverstone CJ

Alverstone CJ

Alverstone CJ (II)

Alverstone CJ (II)

Astbury KC

Astbury KC

Austen Chamberlain

Austen Chamberlain

Avory KC

Avory KC

Bill Mathews

Bill Mathews

Birrell, Augustine

Birrell, Augustine

Blanco White, Thomas Anthony

Blanco White, Thomas Anthony

Bosanquet KC

Bosanquet KC

Bousfield, William Robert

Bousfield, William Robert

Bragge, Nicholas

Bragge, Nicholas

Bruce J

Bruce J

Bucknill J and Buckley J

Bucknill J and Buckley J

Budd, Bernard

Budd, Bernard

Burrell, John

Burrell, John

Carr, Henry

Carr, Henry

Cavendish v Strutt

Cavendish v Strutt

Cavendish v Strutt (II)

Cavendish v Strutt (II)

Cawley, Frederick

Cawley, Frederick

Chancery Division

Chancery Division

Chancery Division (II)

Chancery Division (II)

Channel J

Channel J

Channell J

Channell J

Clarke KC; Isaacs KC and Shee KC

Clarke KC; Isaacs KC and Shee KC

Colefax, Arthur

Colefax, Arthur

Copinger, Walter Arthur

Copinger, Walter Arthur

Corsellis, Douglas

Corsellis, Douglas

Court of Appeal

Court of Appeal

Cowen v Labouchere

Cowen v Labouchere

Cozens-Hardy LJ

Cozens-Hardy LJ

Cripps, Stafford

Cripps, Stafford

Danckwerts KC

Danckwerts KC

Danckwerts KC

Danckwerts KC

Davies, Mervyn

Davies, Mervyn

Drewe, Basil

Drewe, Basil

Essex Court

Essex Court

Everington, Geoffrey

Everington, Geoffrey

Expert Witnesses

Expert Witnesses

Expert Witnesses (II)

Expert Witnesses (II)

Falconer J

Falconer J

Falconer, Douglas

Falconer, Douglas

Fletcher Moulton, John

Fletcher Moulton, John

Floyd, Christopher

Floyd, Christopher

Forbes Robertson

Forbes Robertson

Ford, Peter

Ford, Peter

Francis Taylor Building

Francis Taylor Building

Frank Fitzgibbon

Frank Fitzgibbon

Fred Watts

Fred Watts

Fysh, Michael

Fysh, Michael

Garnett, Kevin

Garnett, Kevin

Geoffrey Maw

Geoffrey Maw

Graham J

Graham J

Graham, Patrick

Graham, Patrick

Gratwick, Stephen

Gratwick, Stephen

Grove, William R.

Grove, William R.

Hayward, Peter

Hayward, Peter

Heald, Lionel

Heald, Lionel

Hobbs, Geoffrey

Hobbs, Geoffrey

Howe, Martin

Howe, Martin

Ian Bowie

Ian Bowie

Isaacs KC

Isaacs KC

Isaacs KC and Avory KC

Isaacs KC and Avory KC

Jacob LJ

Jacob LJ

Jacob, Robin

Jacob, Robin

Jeffs, Julian

Jeffs, Julian

John Call

John Call

John Glazebrook

John Glazebrook

Johnston, Kenneth

Johnston, Kenneth

Joyce J and Channell J

Joyce J and Channell J

Kempe KC; Duke KC; Isaacs KC and Dickens KC

Kempe KC; Duke KC; Isaacs KC and Dickens KC

Kerly, Duncan

Kerly, Duncan

Kings Bench Division

Kings Bench Division

Kitchin, David

Kitchin, David

Kynric Lewis, Alun

Kynric Lewis, Alun

Laddie J

Laddie J

Laddie, Hugh

Laddie, Hugh

Lloyd Jacob J

Lloyd Jacob J

Lloyd Jacob, George

Lloyd Jacob, George

Lloyd, Rhys Gerran

Lloyd, Rhys Gerran

Lochner, Robert

Lochner, Robert

Lord Halsbury

Lord Halsbury

Lord Justice Mathew

Lord Justice Mathew

Lord Macnaghten

Lord Macnaghten

Lunzer, Raph

Lunzer, Raph

Maps

Maps

Master Pollock

Master Pollock

Micklethwait, David

Micklethwait, David

Morcom, Christopher

Morcom, Christopher

Moritz, Rudolph

Moritz, Rudolph

Morton Smith

Morton Smith

Mosley, Max

Mosley, Max

Mould, James

Mould, James

Mowbray, John

Mowbray, John

Mummery, John

Mummery, John

New Court

New Court

Patent Barristers

Patent Barristers

Paterson, Gerald

Paterson, Gerald

Penny, Joe

Penny, Joe

Platts-Mills, Mark

Platts-Mills, Mark

Practice Record 1

Practice Record 1

Practice Record 10

Practice Record 10

Practice Record 11

Practice Record 11

Practice Record 12

Practice Record 12

Practice Record 13

Practice Record 13

Practice Record 14

Practice Record 14

Practice Record 15

Practice Record 15

Practice Record 16

Practice Record 16

Practice Record 2

Practice Record 2

Practice Record 3

Practice Record 3

Practice Record 4

Practice Record 4

Practice Record 5

Practice Record 5

Practice Record 6

Practice Record 6

Practice Record 7

Practice Record 7

Practice Record 8

Practice Record 8

Practice Record 9

Practice Record 9

Prescott, Peter

Prescott, Peter

Price, Vivian

Price, Vivian

Pumfrey J

Pumfrey J

Pumfrey, Nicholas

Pumfrey, Nicholas

Queen Elizabeth Building

Queen Elizabeth Building

Rayner James, Jonathan

Rayner James, Jonathan

Registrars in the KB

Registrars in the KB

Ridley J and Jelf J (KB)

Ridley J and Jelf J (KB)

Rogers J

Rogers J

Rogers, Anthony

Rogers, Anthony

Roy Nicholls

Roy Nicholls

Russell-Clarke, Alain-Daubeny

Russell-Clarke, Alain-Daubeny

Shelley, Kew

Shelley, Kew

Sidney Leigh

Sidney Leigh

Silverleaf, Michael

Silverleaf, Michael

Sir Cornelius Dalton

Sir Cornelius Dalton

Sir Frederick Bramwell

Sir Frederick Bramwell

Skone James, Edmund Purcell

Skone James, Edmund Purcell

Skone James, Francis Edmund

Skone James, Francis Edmund

Stuart Bevan, Peter James

Stuart Bevan, Peter James

Swan, Kenneth

Swan, Kenneth

Terrell, Courtney

Terrell, Courtney

Terrell, Thomas

Terrell, Thomas

The Whitaker Wright Case

The Whitaker Wright Case

Thorley, Simon

Thorley, Simon

Tompkin, Geoffrey

Tompkin, Geoffrey

Tookey, Geoffrey

Tookey, Geoffrey

Turner, Amédée

Turner, Amédée

Vitoria, Mary

Vitoria, Mary

Walker, Eric

Walker, Eric

Wallace, Roger

Wallace, Roger

Walton, Anthony

Walton, Anthony

Watson, Antony

Watson, Antony

Watson, Trevor

Watson, Trevor

Webster, Richard

Webster, Richard

Whitaker Wright (II)

Whitaker Wright (II)

Whitehead, James

Whitehead, James

Whitford J

Whitford J

Whitford, John

Whitford, John

Wilson, Alastair

Wilson, Alastair

Wyand, Roger

Wyand, Roger

Young, David

Young, David

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Barrister

You can add in text here that describes the role of a Barrister.

Chambers

Chambers are a very particular English institution. Pleasantly situated on the edge of the City, the legal district in London is more than just addresses from which barristers develop their practice; they are also places with a shared and rich history.

There, individual barristers of different generations grouped together, met with solicitors and received briefs.

Close to the Royal Courts of Justice, patent chambers were traditionally located at the Temple, an enclave which lies between Fleet Street and Embankment and an area that covers two Inns of Court: the Inner and the Middle Temple.

However, the second half of the twentieth century witnessed their move to the two other Inns, Gray’s and Lincoln’s Inn. When the history of the intellectual property bar is written, this move will be one of the most interesting changes to discuss or explain.

A variety of reasons might have triggered it: the increase of tenancy fees in the Temple, the growth of patent chambers and the need to follow the steps of the most prestigious sets.

Clerks

Clerking involved a lot of work, from learning how to bring work into chambers, selecting the appropriate barrister to match a brief, to running the finances of the chambers.

Perhaps the most important role of barrister’s clerks was however their role as a middlemen, being ‘the link by which barristers and solicitors came together’ (Flood, 1981, 378).

While their main task might be described in terms of administering chambers, clerks from previous generations also developed uniquely personal relationships with barristers in chambers, particularly in patent chambers because of the limited amount of barristers practising the field and the high degree of specialisation that characterised it.

The involvement of clerks in the running of chambers also increased in the late 1950s when the Bar Council implemented the rule that those who wanted to become barristers would be required to complete 12 months of pupillage.

Choosing those who would become patent barristers was an informal but challenging task, often predicated on personal connections, Oxbridge references and scientific backgrounds. Of course, there were exceptions to the rule.

Practice

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Sketches in Court

Sketches in Court: drawings by Sir Kenneth Swan (courtesy of Christopher Morcom, QC).

the bench

After the enactment of the Patents Act (1949), specialist patent judges were appointed from among patent barristers.

The provision that enabled this was contained in section 49 of that Act, making it possible for an additional judge to the High Court to be appointed to deal primarily with patent cases.

The first one was Mr Justice Lloyd Jacob who served until his death in 1969. He was succeeded by Mr Justice Whitford and Mr Justice Graham.

Although the appointment of specialist judges appears to have been received positively, it also attracted controversy due to the idiosyncrasies of some of these figures and the concerns of the ways in which the appeal court dealt with the cases decided in the lower court.

Elevation of the first patent judge, Sir William Aldous, to the Court of Appeal in 1995 was almost as important as the introduction of specialist judges in the High Court.